Is Plan F Going Away?

Is Plan F Going Away?

We get many questions regarding Medicare supplement plan F and Plan C being eliminated in 2020.  However, the impact may not be as significant as you might think.  And it may not even impact you directly.  Read on to learn why this is happening, who this will impact and what it may mean to you.

The quick answer is “yes” for some but “no” for others.

Medicare Supplement Plan F & Plan C are Going Away in 2020

About once a decade, Medicare decides to make a change to the Medicare supplement plan offerings available to Medicare recipients. The most recent change involves the elimination of Medicare supplement Plan F and Plan C in 2020. But, contrary to many folks’ beliefs or concerns, these plans are not going away for everybody.

You might be asking yourself why Medicare would eliminate two of the most popular Medicare supplement plans available. As we all know, Medicare is experiencing increased financial strain from the growth in enrollment from the “Baby Boomer” generation and the ever-increasing cost of medical care. In an attempt to control costs by reducing claims, Congress decided it made sense to have Medicare recipients be responsible for more of their out-of-pocket medical expenses or what they often refer to as having Medicare recipients have more “skin in the game.”

It had long been argued without much substantiation that the “first dollar” coverage available from Medigap Plan F and Plan C because Medicare recipients to see the doctor more frequently than they would if they didn’t have all deductibles covered and had to pay a little out-of-pocket when they go to see a doctor. While an actual cost-savings from this change couldn’t be calculated, it was often cited it would save Medicare billions of dollars each year in medical claim exposure.

While various politicians wanted there to be fairly substantial financial exposure for Medicare recipients, it was eventually decided to just do away with plans that offered full coverage of all deductibles (Plan F and Plan C) to ensure the Medicare beneficiary would have to pay a little out-of-pocket for their medical bills and might be discouraged from going in as frequently.

Others argued that causing the beneficiary to have “more skin in the game” could lead them to not seek treatment when they needed it, which could lead to advanced health conditions that are more difficult and costly to treat. This would be in direct contrast to the reason Medicare decided to cover more preventive benefits starting in 2006. Back then, Medicare felt it would save Medicare billions by allowing beneficiaries to be diagnosed early and treat any condition before it became too advanced and much more expensive to treat.

Beneficiaries That Will Be Able to Keep Plan F or C

The good news for people who join Medicare Part A prior to January 1, 2020, is that Medicare supplement Plan F and C will still be available to you. You will be able to continue to shop for and pick up or change companies for your Medicare supplement Plan F or C after this date (and plans will be available from companies) as long as you can qualify medically (or are in an Open Enrollment or Guaranteed Issue situation).

Beneficiaries That Will NOT Be Able to Keep Plan F or C

For people who join Medicare Part A on or after January 1, 2020, you will unfortunately not have the ability to purchase a Plan F or C. The most comprehensive plan available to you will be Medicare supplement Plan G. Plan G works identically to Medicare supplement Plan F with the only difference being Plan G not covering the Part B deductible. Outside of that one difference, they work the same. Also, in guaranteed issue situations, Medicare supplement plan G will be available with no medical underwriting requirements starting January 1, 2020.

Medigap Plan F vs. Medigap Plan G

Learn more about switching to Medicare supplement Plan G: Switching Medicare Supplement Plans

So, if you own a Medicare supplement Plan F or C when January 1, 2020 comes around you don’t have to do anything as your coverage will still work; however, if you decide you do want to shop the market at that time to determine if you might be able to find a better rate for your coverage you can view your rates for other plans online, or call (866) 894-3258 to speak with one of the friendly and knowledgeable agents at GoMedigap.


GoMedigap is one of the largest and most respected Medicare supplement insurance agencies in the country offering a free service to help Medicare recipients learn about Medicare supplements and how to shop for them from the nation’s top providers such as Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna, Mutual of Omaha and many others.

Compare Your Medicare Supplement Rates Immediately!

66 Replies to “Is Plan F Going Away?”

  1. I am very confused as to what Medicare has to do with what level of policy coverage medigap policies offer to clients. The client pays a premium based on what level of coverage is desired and what they can afford. Therefore, clients that pay the higher premium are, in fact, covering the cost of their deductible and co-payment inclusive in their premium. Others, that chose a less comprehensive plan, pay their deductibles and co-payments themselves, therefore eliminating the medigap plan from paying for these charges. I am aware that Medicare does control the plans (bcdfg) insofar as making sure all medigap insurers provide the same coverage, at their own premium rate. So, i guess my question is….did Medicare go to the medigap plans and tell them it was their plan to eliminate these coverages in 2020 or did the insurance carriers go to medicare and ask that these speficic plans be eliminated? You can also refer me to the powers that be in medicare that make these decisions if you do not know the answer. Thank you for your time.

    1. Thank you for your response. We’re sorry for any confusion and understand your frustration with this happening. Many people do not know that Medicare supplement plan offerings are regulated by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) which is part of the Social Security Administration. So, in this case, Congress instructed Medicare to eliminate these offerings and Medicare in turn notified the insurance companies that they would not be allowed to be sold to people aging in to Medicare Part A after 2019. We hope this answers your question and would be glad to answer any follow-up questions you may have.

      1. So the answer is yes, the insurance companies lobbied congress to eliminate the plans and congress went along with their request, Congress apparently not considering their constituents opted for the insurance companies over them.

      2. Understanding it correctly ….Plan F will not go away until January 1st of 2020 ,so we can still sign up for that plan as long as we do this before that date,but it will not be available anymore for newcomers to sign up after that date ,my question now is by January 1 2020 the premium may go up way much more for the ones who keep having it, correct ?

        1. Hi Clara,

          Yes, that is correct. After January 1, 2020, new Medicare enrollees will not be able to sign up for Plan F.

          Additionally, it is possible for the premium to increase after this date. There is no way to say definitively, but it is highly likely. We recommend that you shop the market beforehand and speak with a Medicare expert who can advise you on what to do in this situation. While Plan F may be the most comprehensive plan, there are other plans, like Plan G, that offer very comprehensive coverage at a much lower rate.

          If you’d like to review both Plan F and Plan G rates, please feel free to give us a call directly at (866) 894-3258 to speak with one of our Medicare experts. Or, you can view your rates online.

    2. Reply to Terri Casey: Medicare is funded through a trust fund,. The Government has given us various dates when this fund will be depleted. Conventional insurance, on the other hand, pay claims by means of a pool of money. When you pay your premiums and the millions of others pay theirs, through many Ins. CO’s, they must pay claims from this pool. The Government even regulates this by mandating that 80+ % must be returned to the policyholder in benefits, leaving maybe 20% for claims payment. Through the years medicare’s deductibles and co- insurances have risen, resulting in most cases an annual increase in premium that companies charge to conform to the aforementioned ratio. I’m stating only standardized supplements for my illustration; Advantage plans operated at the mercy of “Uncle”!

  2. Thank you so much for making us aware of the changes to (C) & (F) & what they are trying to do to us. My husband will be eligible for Medicare in 2018. Knowing this we will certainly get a supplement plan (F) if they haven’t changed it again by then.

    1. Hi there, Mr. Groves.

      We will reach out to you right away to better answer your question. If you have any other questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to us. Thanks!

  3. I have Plan F supplemental through Mutual of Omaha, premium is getting high, $660.00 every 3 months. I want to accept more responsibility and change plans to Plan G, buy paying the deductible and reducing my premium to a more reasonable cost. Will I have to go through the paperwork to be approved for this change? Bob

    1. Hi Bob,

      Thank you for your question. It depends, but it is highly likely you will have to go through paperwork in order to switch. However, we can make that very simple for you. Give one of our agents a call at (866) 894-3258 to go over your situation. I have a hunch you’ve been with that particular policy for several years and feel confident there’s a good chance a GoMedigap agent can find you a Plan F at a much better rate and save you even more by switching to a plan G. It will only take a few minutes and I’m confident you’ll enjoy the conversation.

      Thanks again!

    2. Look into plan C! It is was less expensive and pays well when used! We pay around $40 a month! I was hospitalized with an anyrism in
      March spent 21
      days in the hospital! Our out of pocket was minimal! We have an option C PPO plan!

  4. I’m old enough in March 2017 so I can get plan F. My husband won’t be until January 2020 so he won’t be able to correct? We have Anthem GM retiree now, which will be 2ndary for me this year. Do I still need medigap insurance?

    1. Hi Pam,

      This is a great question.

      When you turn 65 in March, you are eligible for any supplement policy. You can keep your retiree insurance as secondary. However, when it comes time for your husband to go on Medicare, there are some factors that your Medicare supplement insurance company will need to look at to determine if you would be guaranteed a supplement (the state, size of the company, etc.). There are a lot of factors that go into this, and if it doesn’t qualify as a “Guaranteed Issue” situation, then you would have to answer many medical questions to determine if you are still eligible for a Medicare supplement.

      Thus, in the long run, it would probably be safer to consider getting your Medicare supplement when you turn 65.

      At GoMedigap, we specialize in helping our clients find the best Medicare supplement policy for their specific needs and situation, at an affordable rate. We represent 30+ of the top Medicare supplement providers. Our agents provide unbiased, expert advice to educate and ensure our clients receive the best possible coverage and customer service. If you’d like to speak with one of our agents regarding your situation, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258. We look forward to speaking with you!

  5. 1. Does this change apply only to the deductible or is the coverage of copays impacted also?

    Presently my wife and I both have “age issued” plan F policies. (My premium did not increase in 2017.) As the risk pool of Plan F shrinks and ages it seems likely premiums will increase so it might make sense to switch to plan G.

    But if we were to do this, it strikes me that we would lose the benefit of the age issued which we attained at age 62 and 64. and now be saddled with an issue age of 70 or more (Assuming we can even get an age issued policy) What would you advise?

    Finally, what is the impact if the insurance company carrying our Medigap policy were to cease business or stop issuing Plan F policies. Would we be able to obtain another Plan F without medical underwriting and what would happen as far as the age issued question?

    Thanks.

    1. Hi Mr. Smyth,

      Great questions and understanding of the impact of risk pools. Kudos!

      You can keep your plan F until and even beyond 2020. My advice would be to do so if you’re happy with it and you feel like you’re not overpaying.

      However, I think you might be surprised at how little Issue-Age Rated plans make a difference in pricing when considering everything available (depending on your particular situation and the state in which you reside). Often times, you find Attained-Age policies that have better rates.

      I think you would be best served in speaking with one of our agents by calling (866) 894-3258. They’ll need to understand your situation a little better, and then they can help you explore your options.

      Lastly, you have protections in the event that the insurance carrier you’re with goes out of business. You would be Guaranteed Issue into a like or lesser plan from any other company. You can feel safe that this would be a hassle at worst.

      I hope this answered your questions. If we can help further please let us know. Have a great day!

  6. Hi if I have plan F now and decide to switch to G in 2020 (based on various analysts suggesting F rates for grandfathered enrollees will grow faster/more due to shrinking pool) must I go thru u deterioration g to make the change? I’m healthy now and the annual premium savings of switching to G are greater than the uncovered B deductible. What am I missing?

      1. Hi Pattie,

        That’s a great question. Yes, you will have to go through medical underwriting when you switch to Plan G. It would likely be smart to get onto a Plan G while you are healthy now, given that you understand the savings in premiums outweigh the deductible. We typically recommend Plan G to our clients, as many are able to save quite a bit of money due to the difference in premiums.

        At GoMedigap, our unbiased agents are highly skilled in assessing our clients’ specific situation and recommending the best Medicare Supplement for their coverage needs. If you’d like to speak with one directly, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258 for a brief phone conversation. I’m confident you’ll be glad you did.

        Have a great day!

  7. I will be turning 65 on may 14 this year. I am enrolled in MC part A and B effective May 1. After searching multiple sources of information for Medigap plans I understand I am “unable” to apply for a plan until May 1.
    Please confirm if that is so.
    Thank you.

    Joe

    1. Hi Joe,

      Great question. That is absolutely incorrect. You are eligible to enroll in a Medicare supplement plan as soon as 6 months before your effective date. In fact, most people do it 6 months in advance to lock in the least expensive rate possible for them. I recommend you begin shopping for your plan right away.

      GoMedigap is an independent Medicare supplement (Medigap) agency, representing 30+ of the top providers. We specialize in finding you the most affordable price for the coverage you need. Because our agents are paid a flat commission, you can rest assured that you will receive non-biased advice and recommendations. With our proprietary quoting system, our agents can view the rates from all of the available providers to find you the lowest rate. If you have time for a brief discussion, give us a call at (866) 894-3258, and one of our agents will get you taken care of.

      We look forward to speaking with you soon!

  8. I turn 65 in July if I purchase Plan F Can the premium be grandfathered when purchased now so it doesn’t increase through the years?

    1. Hi Debra,

      If you purchase a Plan F today, most companies will lock in the rate for you for 12 months, but every plan takes rate increases throughout the years. You will be able to continue to shop for and change companies for your Plan F even after Plan F goes away (January 1, 2020) as long as you purchase your initial Plan F before this date.

      However, when you do face a rate increase, our Rate Watch team will always proactively notify our clients of their rate increase and help you shop the market to find a lower rate. If you’d like to talk to one of our agents more in depth about Plan F and rate increases, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258. One of our agents will be readily available to help you.

  9. I am 75 years of age, have had plan F with a private insurance company since 2009, will I need to change my policy to another plan before 2020 if I’m okey with the rate increases.

    1. Hi Ms. Eagar,

      No, you will not need to change your policy. Because you’ve already received Medicare, you will always be able to have the Plan F. New Medicare beneficiaries who will be receiving Medicare in 2020 and the following years will not be able to. This means that the premiums will likely begin increasing a bit as the pools of people continue to submit claims. If you are fine with taking rate increases, then you will not need to switch the Plan F come 2020.

      Please let me know if you have any additional questions.

  10. I am 66 years old and my husband will be 72 in August. He is still working and we are covered through his employer. He will likely be retiring this summer and we are looking at Medigap options. My concern with the “G” plan, is Medicare deductibles exponentially increasing to a thousand, or even much more. There is greater piece of mind to buy “F”, but agents, who have contacted us are warning that the pool will be shrinking to such a degree that we will no longer be able to afford the rate increases of the “F” plan. Also, isn’t there a deductible for Medicare B and then also a separate deductible for Medicare A, if one were to be hospitalized?

    1. Hi Mrs. Victor,

      These are great questions. Let’s start with the Plan F.

      In 2020, the Plan F will no longer be sold to individuals who are not already on Medicare. Because of this, as you said, the risk pool will be much smaller. If you purchase a Plan F before 2020, you will still be able to keep your Plan F. Should you receive any rate increases, our Rate Watch team proactively notifies our clients of rate increases and helps them to shop the market for a more affordable plan each year, so you know that you are never overpaying for your coverage.

      We typically recommend the Plan G to the majority of our clients. The Plan G premium is generally much lower than the Plan F premium, with very similar coverage. Though you will have to pay the Part B deductible ($183 in 2017), you will typically save money with the Plan G, since the Plan F premiums are usually much more expensive.

      As a Medicare beneficiary, you are still responsible for the Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B deductibles. With the Medigap Plan F, both of these deductibles would be fully covered. With a Medigap Plan G, the Medicare Part A deductible would be covered, but you would still be responsible for the Part B deductible ($183 in 2017).

      I believe you would be best served in speaking with one of our agents by calling us at (866) 894-3258. They’ll need to understand your situation a little better, and then they can help you explore your options. The best solution for you will depend on your current situation and medical history, and our agents will be able to offer you guidance once they understand those things. I’m confident you’ll enjoy the conversation!

  11. I understand eliminating Plans that cover the deductible so that each enrollee has some skin in the game. So why would they eliminate the Plan F High Deductible Plans (F-HD). My F-HD has a deductible of over $2,100. If I am correct that F-HD is going away, is it wrong to think that only those who are healthy would remain in F-HD and that the premiums would not go through the roof? If someone in Plan F-HD has a bad health year would they be allowed to bailout to Plan G and would they have any pre-existing limitations applied to them?
    Thanks in advance,

    1. Hi Mr. Rice,

      Since you were eligible for Medicare before 2020, you will always have access to your High Deductible Plan F. While they will no longer be offering the High Deductible Plan F (they are replacing it with a High Deductible Plan G), anyone eligible for Medicare prior to 2020 will be able to keep their High Deductible Plan F.

      If you wanted to switch to a Plan G, you would have to undergo medical underwriting.

      I hope this answers your questions. If you’d like to explore your options and see if their may be a better option for you moving forward, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258. One of our agents will be able to answer any questions and review rates from over 30 of the top providers. Have a great day!

  12. Can a person stay on Plan F, while applying for Plan G?

    What happens if you’re denied acceptance to Plan G, can you retain your Plan F?

    1. Hi Mr. Schachtel,

      Yes, you will be able to keep your Plan F until you find out if you are approved for a Plan G. If you are denied coverage for a Plan G, you will be able to retain your Plan F. However, if you are approved for the Plan G, you will have to cancel your Plan F. You cannot have 2 supplement policies at the same time.

      If you’d like to compare rates from 30+ top Medicare supplement providers to ensure you are paying the lowest price, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258 for a brief phone consultation. Because GoMedigap is an independent agency, our agents can provide unbiased advice and recommendations for your situation. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

  13. I am a federal retiree and am trying to decide whether to keep my federal health plan (blue cross basic). I can keep that and get a medicare advantage plan, or drop it and get a supplement. I am not sure which is best. If I drop my feder health plan I can never get it back again. My birthday is in July, 2017 (turn 65)

    1. Hi Kathy,

      In our experience, we typically recommend Medicare and a Medicare supplement. However, it would be best to call us so that we can do a cost/coverage comparison analysis to determine which would be the best option for you.

      In order to assess your situation and determine the best option for you, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258. One of our agents will be happy to help you and provide unbiased advice and guidance. We look forward to speaking with you!

  14. I will be turning 65 on January 1, 2020. Since I will be eligible for Medicare on December 1, 2019 will I still be able to get Plan F. Also, since Plan C and F will no longer be available in 2020, will plan G still be cheaper at that time like it apparently is now?

    1. Hi Carol,

      Yes, you will still be able to get the Plan F because your Medicare effective date before the deadline. As for the Plan G rates, there is no way for us to know definitively this far in advance. Once the time comes for you to begin shopping, it would be smart to shop the rates for both Plan F and Plan G to ensure you are getting the best value for your coverage.

      At GoMedigap, we can compare rates for all of the plans from 30+ of the top providers. When you begin shopping for your Medicare supplement, please feel free to give us a call at 866-894-3258, and one of our professional agents will be happy to assist you.

  15. I have been told that qualified Plan F policies, that I can consider, turning 65 in late 2017, run the risk of seeing ever higher premium increases year over year, as the risk pool shrinks after 2020. Do current Plan F “guaranteed premium for life” policies on the market by certain insurance companies make sense…..as a hedge against ever-increasing premiums for Plan F current participants?

    1. Hi Mr. Riechers,

      While we cannot say definitively, it is possible that Plan F will face higher premium increases each year as 2020 approaches. While the guaranteed premium for life policies may make sense for your situation, you would end up paying quite a bit for your premium each month. There may be a couple of better options for you.

      To best understand your situation, it would be best if we could speak with you on the phone for a free, brief phone consultation. Because GoMedigap is an independent agency, and equally represents over 30 of the top providers, you can rest assured that our agents will give you completely unbiased advice regarding your situation.

      In addition, GoMedigap has a Rate Watch program, which will actively notify you annually if you are facing a rate increase. At that time, our Rate Watch team will contact you and shop the market for you again to see if you could save some money on your premium, without risking your coverage. To speak with one of our professional agents, please give us a call at 866-894-3258. I’m confident you’ll be glad you did. We look forward to speaking with you soon!

  16. So, is there any analysis done that would provide a chart of possible increase in premiums for plan F over the years 2020 through 2050? Or for at least 2020 through 2035? Eventually all of us in plan F will die. Are insurance companies using fear of rising premiums to steer people early into Plan G because it is better for the insurance company not the person buying it?

    1. Hi there,

      Unfortunately, there is no way to predict or forecast exactly how much Plan F premiums will increase after 2020. However, if you have a Plan F prior to 2020, you will not be stuck with that Plan F forever. You can continue to shop for and pick up or change companies for your Plan F after this date as long as you qualify medically.

      Many are fearing that Plan F rates will increase rapidly after 2020. There is no way to predict this definitively, but it is possible. Because of this, many have and will switch to Plan G, which is identical to Plan F except the Part B deductible ($183 in 2017). Though you will have to pay the $183 deductible, many typically save more money with this plan due to the lower monthly premiums.

      If you’d like to explore the Plan G to avoid the risk of Plan F rate increases, please give us a call at 866-894-3258 for a brief consultation. One of our non-biased agents will be happy to assist you and help you find a plan that suites your needs. Have a great day!

  17. My husband is age 68 and he currently has a HD F plan. So far his out of pocket expenses have been much less than the $2200 deductible he is responsible for. It has been recommended that he switch to Plan G to better control costs in the future should he develop ongoing health problems. For some reason it makes me nervous for him to stay on the HD plan since he would have to go through medical underwriting to switch plans and at that time it might be too late. Do you think it would be wiser to go ahead and switch plans?

    1. Hi Bridget,

      Plan G can be a smart option for many, as the only deductible you’ll have to meet is only $183 (in 2017). Additionally, the premiums are typically affordable for many.

      If your husband wants to shop the market for a Plan G, he will not have to cancel his HDF coverage until he has been accepted into Plan G. Therefore, if he is unfortunately declined from Plan G coverage after medical underwriting, he will not be without coverage, because he will still have his HDF plan. If he is accepted into Plan G, then he can cancel his HDF coverage once he receives the approval email.

      Because Medicare supplement companies all have different underwriting guidelines and policies, it would be best for him to compare rates and underwriting guidelines from multiple companies. At GoMedigap, we represent over 30 of the top Medicare supplement companies. Our agents also have underwriting expertise, as well as a team of in-house underwriters. Because of this, when we compare rates with your husband, we can also review the underwriting policies of each company to ensure you have the highest probability of acceptance when submitting your application.

      To speak with our team of Medicare supplement experts, please call us at 866-894-3258, and one of our professional agents will be able to help you and your husband with your Medicare needs. Have a great day!

    1. Lana,

      Because Medicare and Medicare supplements are nationwide coverage, you will not have a problem if you move. If you move, simply call your insurance carrier and update your address. There will be no lapse in coverage, and you will keep your insurance regardless of where you move in the country.

      Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Have a great day!

  18. I am 80 years of age. My wife is 74 and employed so we are covered under her employer’s health insurance plan. We are Social Security recipients and have Medicare A but do not have or need Medicare B at this time. When her retirement date nears and we both enroll in Medicare B, will the insurers offering Plan G have to accept us regardless of age or health without going through medical underwriting?

    1. Mr. Young,

      Upon retiring and enrolling in Part B, you will enter your Open Enrollment period, which begins 6 months before taking Medicare Part B. During this period, you will be guaranteed issue for your Medicare supplement Plan G. This means you will not have to go through medical underwriting with no risk of being declined.

      However, your premium could be somewhat influenced by your age, as is the case for all Medicare supplement premiums. To get a quote on the rates for you and your wife, please enter your information on the link below and you will be able to view your rates online for the Plan G.

      Here’s the link: Compare Medicare Supplement Rates

      Or, you can give us a call directly at (866) 894-3258 and one of our agents will be happy to assist you and present your rates over the phone. Have a great day!

  19. Madeline, I’ve heard that Plan F is being discontinued in 2020. Several companies I’ve talked with recommend Plan F, while others state Plan G. Their rational (and push) is that when Plan F is closed, the pool of contributors will shrink and premiums will soar. It would seem that Plan G makes more sense. Can you comment on the Plan F soaring cost theory?

    The Plan F (most popular) advocates have explanations I don’t fully understand. Thanks. D

    1. Mr. Erickson,

      I completely understand your confusion. Many people have different theories about Plan F decisions, so there are many different “answers” out there.

      While no one knows definitively, Plan F premiums will very likely increase once Plan F stops being sold to new beneficiaries. If that is the case, then Plan G may make more sense for you.

      The bottom line is that it depends on the premiums. Plan F offers full coverage – it covers all of your deductibles, copays and coinsurance for Medicare-approved expenses. Because of this, Plan F typically has the most expensive premiums. Plan G, on the other hand, offers full coverage except for the Part B deductible (which is $183 in 2017). Other than the Part B deductible, the rest is covered. So, once you meet your Part B deductible of $183 each year, you essentially obtain full coverage and have Plan F coverage.

      Because the Plan G requires that you pay the Part B deductible, it typically has much lower premiums than the Plan F. Because of this, the savings from the lower premium typically outweighs the $183 deductible. Many of our clients have saved quite a bit of money by choosing the Plan G.

      Your Medicare supplement premiums will depend on a number of factors. At GoMedigap, we are an independent agency and represent over 30 of the top providers. Our highly-educated agents are paid a flat-rate commission regardless of which company or plan you choose to go with. If you’d like to compare your Medicare supplement rates online for Plan F and Plan G, please fill out this form: View Medicare Supplement Rates Online!

      Better yet, give us a call at 866-894-3258 and one of our professional agents will be readily available to assist you in your search. We look forward to hearing from you!

  20. Both my husband & I are on plan F. You are saying the premiums on these plans will mostly likely rise. What about the deductibles on plan G? Will they likely rise too?

    1. Hi Colette,

      While there is no way to know for sure, the deductibles for Plan G have historically increased a little bit each year. However, the increase has not been very drastic. For example, the Part B deductible required by Plan G in 2016 was $166. In 2017, it increased to $183. That’s about a 10% increase. So, although we can’t predict how much the deductibles will increase, I would assume that they would continue to increase by a percentage each year.

  21. A supplemental Medigap policy that I am considering has come in the mail, but I am concerned about the Premium Agreement that states on each annual anniversary of your Effective Date, premiums will increase due to the increase in your age. The renewal premium for this policy will be the renewal premium then in effect for your attained age. The premium may also change for other reasons. Any change in premium will apply to all covered persons in your same class based on the issue state of this policy. While $87.84 a month sounds reasonable, I am wondering how high this Puritan Life Medigap policy could be should I live to be 85 or so?

    1. Hi Ms. Null,

      You are correct in your understanding that your premium will increase each year. However, there is no way to predict by how much your premium will increase each year. Historically, increases tend to be by a small percentage.

      At GoMedigap, we have a program called Rate Watch. Through our Rate Watch program, our agents proactively monitor your rates annually and will notify you if you are facing a rate increase. If and when you do face a rate increase, we shop the market for you to see if there is a better option out there for you financially. Would you like to be enrolled in our Rate Watch program? If you’d like to learn more, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258, and one of our agents will be happy to speak with you about the program.

      Have a great day!

  22. I have Medicare Advantage. My Horizon BC plan is being dropped in 2018 and what is left is not so good. I can move to another company, but, can I move to a Supplemental plan (age 77 now and have had bladder cancer), and if so would the cost be higher than the normal “aging in” adjustments?

    1. Hi Gene,

      There is no quick and easy answer to your question. Eligibility for Medicare Supplement Insurance depends on a variety of things. Additionally, different companies have different requirements for current health conditions.

      If you’d like to speak with a professional regarding your eligibility and discuss all of your options, please give us a call directly at (866) 894-3258. Or, you can view your Medicare supplement rates online.

      Let me know if you have any additional questions. We look forward to hearing from you!

  23. I understand that Medicare cost plans will not be available in 2019. These plans (where available) provide great coverage at less premiums than supplemental plans. Do you know what will happen to us who have been happy for many years with cost plans.? Other than higher premiums, copays and deductibles. (We live in Mn).

    1. Hi there,

      Since most of the Medicare Cost Plans will not be renewing, it is likely that you will lose your coverage. In this event, the “Cost Plan” insurance company can convert the plan into a Medicare Advantage plan.

      At this time, you will be able to pick up a Medicare Advantage or a Medicare supplement. There will not be a Guaranteed Issue opportunity for enrolling in a Medicare supplement, so you would have to pass medical underwriting.

      I hope this helps. If you’d like to explore your options and learn more about Medicare supplements, please feel free to reach out to us directly. Our agents are highly trained and represent over 30 of the top providers, meaning you will receive unbiased advice regarding your coverage.

      Please feel free to give us a call at (866) 894-3258 and we would be happy to help you. Have a great day!

  24. I have been in remission for stage four non-Hodgkins lymphoma since 2009. I have plan F, but if I wanted to change to plan G, would that medical history prevent me from doing so? My last maintenance treatment was this week, and my doctor told me she would see me in a year! But I am concerned that if I apply for plan G, I might pay higher premiums and not be able to switch.

    1. Hi Ms. Skelton,

      Though Medicare supplement plans in general are standardized, the company underwriting guidelines are not. So, one company may have very different qualifying requirements based on your medical history than another company. Insurance companies have 2 year, 3 year and 5 year lookback periods for cancer. Because of this, you should evaluate all of the Medicare supplement companies to see which company you have the highest chance of being approved with. Because you have been in remission for 8 years and assuming you have no other serious health conditions, you should qualify for coverage with most of the insurance companies.

      In order to do this, you should work with an independent agent. At GoMedigap, our agents represent 30+ of the top Medicare supplement companies, and they are highly skilled with underwriting requirements. The agent you work with will be able to understand your current and past health situation and check the company requirements to ensure you have the highest chance of approval when you apply. If you will not be approved due to your medical history, the agent will be upfront with you and let you know in advance.

      Additionally, you will not risk losing your Plan F when you apply for Plan G. If you are approved for the Plan G, you can proceed to cancel your Plan F at that time. If you are denied coverage for the Plan G, there is no harm done as you still have your Plan F.

      To speak with a professional independent agent, please give us a call directly at (866) 894-3258 and we will be happy to help you. Or, you can view your Plan G rates online.

  25. From what I understand, in 2020, plan “F” will no longer be sold to individuals who are not already on Medicare. I have had plan F since 1995. It is getting expensive and I would like to find a more affordable plan F policy. Do I have to buy another plan F before the 2020 dead line or can buy it at anytime.?
    Thanks, Joe

    1. Hi Joe,

      Because you have had your Plan F since 1995, Plan F will still be available to you, even after the 2020 deadline. You will be able to continue to shop for and pick up or change companies for your Medicare supplement Plan F as long as you qualify medically.

      If you’d like a more affordable policy, have you considered the Plan G? Medicare supplement Plan G is similar to Plan F in that it covers the majority of your expenses. The only exposure for you will be the Medicare Part B deductible (in 2017, this deductible is $183). Often times, Plan G premiums are so much lower than Plan F that the savings in premium outweighs the deductible you will pay. This is why Plan G is quickly becoming the most popular Medicare supplement plan.

      If you’d like to view rates for the Medicare supplement Plan G and learn more about it, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258. Or, you can view your Plan G rates online. We look forward to speaking with you!

  26. My wife and I are both over 65 and enrolled in A but declined B since I am still working and have excellent private health insurance. When I retire, I had always planned on picking up Plan F for both of us, especially since my wife has serious medical issues that run in to the hundreds of thousands of dollars per year.

    First question – Your article states “For people who join Medicare Part A on or after January 1, 2020, you will unfortunately not have the ability to purchase a Plan F or C.” Since we are already have A, does that mean if I retire after Jan 1 2020, we would still have the option to enroll in Plan F?

    Second question – From my analysis, there would be little difference for us between F & G with todays rates with the assumption that we would always need to pay the full part B deductibles if on G. However, if I make the assumption that this will change over time due to the reduction of people enrolled in F, moving to G in the future would be the prudent thing to do. But due to my wife’s medical history, could she be denied G if we start on F and then try and move to G later on? If so, then enrolling in G upon retirement seems the sensible thing to do since we cannot be denied during our open enrollment period.

    Thanks, for trying to keep all this straight and explaining to everyone how our bizarre medical system works!

    1. Hi Mr. Wheatcroft,

      You seem to have a very good understanding of Medicare! Kudos to you.

      In regards to your first question, you are correct. Because you are eligible for Medicare prior to January 1, 2020, you will still have the right to enroll in Plan F.

      However, you may not want to. To answer your second question, yes, she could be denied Plan G if she enrolls in Plan F first and then wants to switch. It would really just depend on her exact health conditions and what the underwriting requirements are for each carriers. We would need to understand a bit more of your health conditions before stating whether or not both of you could eventually switch to Plan G.

      Because your only out-of-pocket exposure with Plan G is the Part B deductible ($183 in 2017 but subject to increase each year), you may save quite a bit of money with the Plan G due to the low premiums.

      When you do retire, it would be best for you and your wife to work with a Medicare supplement agent to answer your questions. At GoMedigap, we can understand your exact health conditions and let you know whether the Plan F or Plan G would make the most sense for you financially. Additionally, our agents can educate and inform you on whether you will likely be eligible to switch plans in the future, given your current and past health conditions.

      When you’re ready to learn more and move forward with your Medicare supplement plans for yourself and your wife, please feel free to give us a call at (866) 894-3258.

  27. what’s the cost difference between a Medicare advantage plan and a Medicare supplement plan? I. Am having a hard time deciding between the two.

    1. Hi Ms. Ester,

      This is a great question – and a question we receive quite often from our clients. Though both policies help cover the gaps in Original Medicare, they are designed very differently. The option that will be best for you will likely depend on your coverage needs and your unique health care preferences. Let’s dive a bit into each type of coverage.

      Your first option is to stick with Original Medicare and purchase a Medicare supplement. With Medicare supplements, you can see any provider that participates in Medicare (most providers do), regardless of which company you purchase your supplement from. Medicare supplement plans will offer you the most freedom to choose your own doctor. Your provider bills Medicare, then Medicare pays its share of the bill and sends the rest to your supplement company to pay. If you enroll in a full coverage plan, like Plan F or Plan G, you will have little to no out-of-pocket expenses.

      Medicare supplement premiums are typically more expensive than Medicare Advantage plan premiums. However, long-term, you will have better coverage with less out-of-pocket exposure to copays and coinsurance. Your coverage will be more secure with less risk of instability and changing benefits.

      Your second option is a Medicare Advantage plan. Medicare Advantage plans are private insurance plans – you are essentially replacing your Original Medicare coverage with the private insurance plan. Typically, they will have lower premiums. This is because you agree to use the plan’s network of providers, rather than having the freedom to choose your own. You’ll also have substantially fewer doctors to choose from than you would with Original Medicare. Because of this, it is critical that you check to make sure that your doctor is included in your plan’s network of doctors. With certain plans, you may be able to go out-of-network, but this will result in higher out-of-pocket costs. Last, you will have to pay copays for the services you receive from your providers. These differ with each plan type, so you’ll want to review these as well.

      Here are some additional factors you’ll want to consider:
      Your tolerance for monthly premiums,
      Whether you want to have to worry about deductibles,
      Your expected costs of healthcare services,
      How often you use healthcare services, and
      Whether your doctor participates in the network for your Medicare Advantage plan.

      At GoMedigap, we specialize in Medicare. Because we are an independent agency and represent over 30 of the top providers, our agents can give you completely unbiased advice on your supplemental coverage. If you’d like additional help understanding your best option for Medicare, please give us a call at (866) 894-3258. Or, you can view your Medicare supplement rates online.

  28. Hi, I am disabled on Social Security Disability. I have Plan F and I’m 58. I have had this supplemental plan since I moved to Pennsylvania from Virginia in 2011. I previously had Medicare Advantage in Virginia and I was not getting treated because most of the doctors simply wouldn’t participate. Being on disability, would I qualify for Plan G being on disability with Arthritis and Fibromyalgia? What else is available for the handicapped who are not on SSI? I worked for a living and I didn’t blow out my brain on drugs.

    1. Hi Ms. McGowan,

      In order to qualify for Plan G, you would need to be in an Open Enrollment Period or a Special Election Period, which you are not at the moment. You’ll have to stay with your Plan F until you turn 65. At this time, your Open Enrollment Period will start again, and you will be able to switch to any Medicare supplement plan without having to qualify.

      I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have any additional questions.

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